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Solar continues to be held captive to net metering limits

April 22, 2015

With this winter's snow all but melted and the temperatures climbing, solar projects across the Commonwealth remain on hold thanks to net metering cap limits. As of 4/22, more than 60 MW of solar was on the waiting list in National Grid territory (see table below).  The current backlog of solar projects is greater than the total amount solar installed in Massachusetts in 2011.  Stalled projects include low income, community shared and municipal solar projects.

Solar community asks legislators to act quickly to raise net metering caps

April 15, 2015

In a letter sent to legislators today, Massachusetts solar industry representatives asked legislators to raise net metering caps as soon as possible.  Net metering caps have been hit in National Grid territory, limiting access to solar in 171 comunities in the Commonwealth and stalling more than 55 MW of solar projects (see column d in the highlighted area below).  The amount of solar projects on hold at the moment exceeds the total capacity of solar installed in Massachusetts in 2011.

New Study Values Solar at 22-28 cents per kWh

April 14, 2015

A study released today by the Acadia Center puts the value of solar at 22-28 cents/kWh, with additional societal values of 6.7 cents/kWh.  A summary of the study's results from the Acadia Center is below.  You can access the study here.

More than 120 people stand up for solar on Beacon Hill

April 8, 2015

Massachusetts citizens, businesses, organizations and solar developers from across the Commonwealth gathered on Beacon Hill yesterday at the Stand Up for Solar lobby day.  More than 120 people met with or stopped by more than 130 legislative offices in a strong show of support for solar and the policies that have encouraged its development. Participants asked legislators to act quickly to address the net metering cap issue to keep solar working for Massachusetts.

Are solar and net metering a net positive for ratepayers?

April 6, 2015

The answer is, yes.  As an increasing number of studies have shown, more often than not, solar and net metering provide a net benefit to ratepayers.  Nevertheless, utility companies, and others in Massachusetts continue to assert that solar and net metering raises electricity rates and only benefits the lucky few solar owners.   They even claim that solar hurts low income people.  These claims are misguided and untrue.

DPU okays adjustment to National Grid's net metering caps

April 2, 2015

On March 31, the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) approved a petition filed by National Grid (Company) in mid-February to adjust capacity under the Company's caps. This request was filed after an internal review revealed that solar projects had been included under the wrong cap.

Situation goes from bad to worse as net metering cap stalls private projects in National Grid territory

March 31, 2015

Update: The number of solar projects on hold has doubled in the last 24 hours. As of 4:00PM on April 1st, there are now 22.7 MW of solar projects on hold. This is not a joke. 

Solar valued at 20-25 cents per kWh in Connecticut

March 27, 2015

An analysis released today by the Acadia Center, puts the value of solar electricity in Connecticut at 20-25 cents/kWh. This valuation does not include an estimated 9.6 cents/kWh of benefits resulting from avoided pollution, such as carbon, SOx and NOx emissions.  Media coverage here.

Solar industry’s survival threatened by net meter caps

March 27, 2015

Over half of the 12,000 jobs in the Massachusetts solar industry are at risk due to net metering caps set by the Massachusetts legislature. Solar installers are being forced to put their projects in National Grid's territory on hold. 

Global energy sector carbon emission growth stalls for the first time in 40 years

March 24, 2015

Finally!  Some good news for the climate and further evidence that the energy revolution underway in many parts of the world is having a postive impact: global carbon dioxide emissions did not rise in 2014 despite economic growth. 

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